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If a child can't learn the way we teach, maybe we should teach the way they learn.


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Look What’s Coming

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Kicking off the Daily 3

My professional goal this year is to implement the Daily 3 (an adapted version of the Daily 5).  The Daily 3 is a way of structuring our language arts block so every student is independently engaged in literacy tasks. These research-based tasks are those that will have the biggest impact on student reading and writing achievement, as well as helping to nurture a lifelong love of reading and writing in children. Students receive explicit whole group instruction and are then given time to independently read, write, and work on vocabulary skills, while I provide focused, intense instruction to individuals and small groups of students. The students will become independent learners and thinkers.

So far, we have learned about and practiced Part One of Daily 3: “Read-to-Self,” in which we discussed expectations of ourselves and created the anchor chart below to record our thinking

 

To help us gradually become more independent, we began practicing these expectations for 3 minutes straight so that everyone could be successful. We learned the word stamina and how our stamina would improve with daily practice. We reviewed our charts; then after the 3 minutes, we reflected on what went well. By Day 2, the students read for over 20 minutes, and they were engaged the entire time. The goal for 4th and 5th graders is to make it a full 45 minutes. In the weeks to come, I will spend time learning about the students’ strengths and greatest needs as readers and writers in order to plan for each student’s instruction. This is a process, which takes time to develop properly.

Here are a few pictures of our three reading spaces, featuring lots of comfy seating to help us be as comfortable as possible while we enjoy the books we choose to read:

 

One of the main goals in my 4th & 5th grade classrooms is for students to become so independent that they can handle working and learning on their own without having a teacher monitor their every move.